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Beer Review #45 Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout

While I am stuck in Texas my family back home is getting hit with another snow storm, not as bad as last week’s storm though. This one is only going to be dropping a foot and a half on them. When I think of winter or snow, there is only one drink that will help balance out all of that white. That drink is a stout. Nice, dark, rich, creamy, silky, and roasty are all words that come to mind when I think of a stout.

I recently had the pleasure of have a Samuel Smith Oatmeal Stout again. I first had it a year or so ago and loved it. I finally got the chance to have it again and I did not pass up on the opportunity. It pours a deep black with a brownish/tan head. It is actually clear if you tilt the glass a bit to get a thin cross section of the beer. On the nose there are a lot of roasty aromas. It has a slightly bitter/sour smell like that of unsweetened coco.

The first sip is fully of roasty flavors. It is super malty and has a sweetness, mostly do to the oatmeal grain that it is brewed with. I got a lot of bakers chocolate in there as well along with hints of campfire. That might sound odd, but it is wonderful. The mouthfeel is silky but also thick. It goes down very easy.

Overall I think this is a great stout. It is very drinkable and I could easily put away a few of these things. Some might find it filling, but I don’t have a problem with it. When I think of an oatmeal stout, Samuel Smith’s is what a reference everything to. I would highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys a solid stout. (more…)

Belgian Dubbel Recipe

08-14-02The evil homebrew monkeys are churning in my head. I already have the Triple going and I am planning on racking it to the secondary this weekend so getting the most out of my yeast sounds like a good idea. I have the space in my fermenters right now to make an additonal beer and I am still on my Belgian kick so this seems perfect. I am going to make a nice dark, malty, and spicy Belgian Dubbel.

Part of my want to make this beer (other than reusing yeast) came from the May/June 2009 addition of Zymurgy. In it they say, “It was a sight to behold: glistening ruby highlights; a thick, creamy head; aromas of malt and caramel; sweet, but with a dry finish; hints of dark fruit and spices.” O my, that sounds wonderful.

08-14-01I loosely based my recipe off of some research and some of the recipies that the magazine provided. I also only wanted to make a small batch, like a case worth. Below is the recipe that I decided on.

  • 5.5 pounds of Belgian Pale malt
  • 6 oz Belgian Special B malt
  • 4 oz Munich malt
  • 4 oz Caramunich malt
  • 4 oz wheat malt
  • 1/2 pound of Amber Belgian Candy sugar
  • .5 oz Styrian Goldings hops (60 mins)
  • 1 oz Saaz hops (15 mins)
  • WYeast 1214 (reused from Belgian Tripel)

I’m shooting for a gravity of 1.062 which is on the low end of the style guidlelines. A 6.13% abv will be a nice compliment to the Tripel and I am not looking for alcohol notes in this beer like I was for the Tripel. A bitterness of 20 IBUs falls right in the middle of the style guidelines. This beer is going to be darker than what the guidelines call for but I don’t really care that much. The upper end of the Lovibond scale is 17°L, this beer is expected to come in at 21°L so it isn’t a drastic difference. The only thing that should change a bit are those “ruby highlights” that Zymurgy talked about.

The Tripel is coming along nicely. There is a nice smell and spicyness to it currently. I am just waiting for the gravity to drop a bit more. I will update on the Tripel when I rerack it and a Dubbel brewday post should soon follow.