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Yeast Washing: A how to

Yeast is the single most expensive ingredient that you will purchase as a homebrewer. Per unit it blows away any other ingredient. Grain is generally $2.50 and under per pound. Hops runs $2.00 and under an ounce. And we don’t really put water into the equation since it’s cheaper than anything else. Yeast on the other hand is usually $6-12 a vial or smack pack depending on the store, variety, and rarity of the yeast stain you buy. Even dry yeast runs around $3.00 a unit. For this reason, many homebrewers like to reuse yeast and thus, bring down the cost per unit of their yeast. But what happens if you want to brew a stout and then a light colored ale? There really isn’t a good way of getting all of the beer and wort separated fully.

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I’ve been trying to make some strides in my homebrewing costs and I stumbled into yeast washing. The idea behind yeast washing is that you take a yeast cake, add water, and then pour the slurry into smaller containers. You then give the slurry time to separate and repeat. The heavy materials (dead yeast, hop particles, etc) will settle to the bottom and the healthy yeast will remain in suspension or layer on top of the heavy materials. You then pour the good stuff into another container and get rid of the heavy materials. Now let’s get into the nitty gritty. (more…)

Lubbock, TX Triple J Sampler Beer Review

Two weeks ago I was in Lubbock, Texas doing some job hunting during my spring break. Naturally one of the first things I did was look for a brewpub to visit. I found the Triple J Chophouse and Brew Company. You can check out their site here. Triple J is a nice place; it has some good food (a bit overpriced) and looked to have some promising beer.

09-03-19-01For a seemlingly upscale place, the table covers were brown paper. Kind of werid but I liked it. Anyway, onto the beer. I ordered the sampler which came with four of the breweries five beers, my server gave me a taste of the other one as well. From right to left you have the stout, cream ale, rye ale, raider red, and the smaller sample was of their IPA.

The cool thing was that they served their beers in little mason jars. The stout was pretty good; nice, roasty, and well balanced. I enjoyed it but it was nothing super special. A very good example of the style. The cream ale wasn’t my favorite. It wasn’t very creamy with no head and a real lack of flavor. The rye ale was a nice treat. I love rye beers with their suttle flavors and this one was a bit different. The rye was really allowed to shine and it got better the more I drank. The Raider Red (Lubbock is home of the Texas Tech Red Raiders) was my least favorite of all of the beers. The website claims it is malty and balanced with hops, but I think it was way over hopped. There was a bit of nice malt upfront but it faded quickly with the hops. The final beer was the IPA small sample. As with the Raider Red it was over hopped, but it fits with the style. My problem was that it went too far with the hops. I like an IPA that has a little something else to offer, this did not. There was not a strong malt backbone to help balance the hops at all. Some may love it, I did not.

If you are in Lubbock for any reason (please don’t) then check out the Triple J. It’s not my favorite brewpub but it offers tons of different beers thoughout the year.