Skip to main content

Beer Review #50 Gordon Biersch Märzen

Being that March is almost over, I figured that I should put a review of a Märzen up here. Märzen is German for March beer. See you learn something new everyday. This particular brew is made by Gordon Biersch out of San Jose, California. Right off the bat, if you are a fan of subtle, malty lagers, this on is for you.

The beer pours a nice orange amber color and it is perfectly clear. There is a slightly off-white head to goes along with it. The nose was actually pretty full for a lager, as most lagers tend to be kind of stale on the nose. The things I picked up on the nose was malty, bready, and toasty notes. There was a sweetness about the nose that I really enjoyed. A single note of hop could be found towards the end, but I really had to search to find it.

On the first taste the bready notes from the nose overrun the palate. The rest of the malt washes in as well after a few sips. There is a slight hop finish that tasted like Hallertau, which is one of the classic if not the most classic German hop. There is also a slightly honey-like flavor in the beer, which I really enjoyed. There is a very clean finish that leaves a great aftertaste.

Gordon Biersch Märzen comes with a medium body and nice carbonation. The carbonation seemed a bit lower than a normal beer, which really let the malty flavor shine. It is super drinkable and a great beer for March. I really loved every drop of the six pack that I purchased. If you like malty, clean beers that are more complex than the nose would lead you to believe then this is a beer for you. I also have a love of quality German lagers. Call it my German ancestry or my eastern PA roots, but I really love almost any German style of beer. This is one of my new favorites and I am glad that I found it in the season it was supposed to be drank in. (more…)

Beer Review #41 Winter Welcome Ale

I have a few more winter seasonal beers to get though but today’s review comes all the way from Yorkshire, England. It is Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome Ale. I’ve had a few other Samuel Smith beers before and I have liked every single one. I think their Oatmeal Stout should be the standard of the style because it is just so perfect. Samuel Smith’s is also Yorkshire’s oldest brewery and dates back to 1758.

The beer pours a nice amber, copper color with a large fluffy head that quickly fades to a thin lace. It is perfectly clear and looks more the part of a winter beer than my last review did. The nose on the beer is full of a lot of fruity esters. In particular grape and dried fruit comes to mind. There is a bit of malt sweetness in there, but the fruit is the most prevalent smell. I didn’t get much in the way of hops on the nose though.

On the first sip, it tasted like an English pub ale with more than normal fruity esters. The fruit really comes through on the back-end of the beer. There was very limited malt flavor throughout the drink. There was also a bit of the hop bite on the end but it also finishes very crisp. The beer is extremely dry, perhaps one of the most dry beers that I have ever had. And the aftertaste is mostly biscuit and toasty flavors. It is an amazingly complex beer that really allows you to sample each layer.

This beer would be excellent for anyone who loves English ales. It isn’t hoppy at all and is packed with flavor. The flavors are not overwhelming, they are layered and a bit hidden. The more you drink it, the more things you find to taste. This ale comes in at 6% ABV. I wasn’t sure what to expect when I got this beer, but I was pleasantly surprised. If you like complex beers or English ales, this one is for you. (more…)

Beer Review #34 Brooklyn Pennant Ale ’55

11-12-05A few years  ago when I started to like the whole craft beer thing I bought a sampler case from the Brooklyn Brewery. At the time it was the most expensive case of beer I bought, coming in at $34.95. I have since passed that mark for expensive cases, but that really doesn’t mean much. A good beer can be found in a $25 case and a bad beer can be found in a $100 case. Price doesn’t really equate to quality in the craft beer world.

When I got that variety case from Brooklyn Brewery I loved the Pennant Ale ’55. Ever since I have been wanting to get just a six pack so that I could have it again. My local store carries Brooklyn Lager and occasionally Brooklyn Pale Ale, but I have never seen the Pennant Ale 55′. I walked in the other day, and there it was. I have got to tell you that I was more than excited. I quickly brought it and $8.99 and a short ride later and it was all mine to drink.

11-12-03Brooklyn Pennant Ale 44′ pours a golden amber in color with a slightly off-white head. The head is thick and lasting and a thin head will remain through the entire beer. There are a lot of small to medium bubbles and the beer is perfectly clear. The nose is very malty. Biscuit, toast, and bread were what I picked up in the malt area. There was a slight hop aroma, being slightly floral, but not overpowering and not bitter at all.

On the first taste the malt was the first thing that I noticed. There is a lot  caramel notes along with bread. A few other toasty notes were found, but they were not overpowering. The hop of course comes on the back-end and provides a nice bite to the caramel of the malt. It is not a overly hoppy beer, but has a strong finish. I also picked up a slight metallic flavor in there, that I didn’t remember from before when I had drank it. Perhaps I just had an old six pack as seems to be common for good beer here in Lubbock.

The mouthfeel is medium in body, but very round. It starts light and grows quickly on the tongue, and then leaves quickly. It finishes very dry. Brooklyn Pennant Ale ’55 is named for the Brooklyn Dodgers and when they last won the Pennant. It is a very drinkable beer that is also enjoyable. If you like round body, caramel filled, dry finish ales, then this beer is for you.  I’ve probably had better from this style of beer, but Brooklyn Brewery makes a strong entry. (more…)